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Chapter 01: Page 10
Originally posted on:08/07/2006
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Chapter 01: Page 10

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Can't take the sky...
08/07/2006
For those who havenít read the character summaries in the about section: Yes, Vaegyr and Larissa are married.

The final panel of this page includes a poster based on a design for sale at Black Market Beagles (used with permission). If youíre a fan of Firefly/Serenity, then you definitely want to go and check them out, a great collection of unofficial merchandise.

Which prompts two questions:

1. Are Vaegyr and Larissa fans of Firefly?
Answer: Yes.

2. Are people still *watching* Firefly in the 27th century?

Thatís a fair question. Seven hundred years is a very long time for a television series to survive, especially a series which didnít even make it to the end of its first season.

But hereís my answer: ďQuality enduresĒ.

Today, people still watch classic shows. Sure, The Day the Earth Stood Still may be dated in a lot of ways, but that doesnít stop it from being a great story. Similarly, people still watch Charlie Chaplin, or the Marx Brothers, because they are still funny. The history of film and TV is littered with a tremendous amount of tripe which has been mostly forgotten, and rightly so. But the quality material endures. This is perhaps why we sometimes have a rose-tinted recollection of the good old days of TV and film, because we have filtered out all of the garbage and are left with only the sweet, shiny goodness to recall.

But is seven hundred years too long for a story to survive? Well Shakespeare has survived for over four hundred years, The Song of Roland for nearly a thousand years. Beowulf is even older than that. Then there are the classic plays of Greece and Rome. And donít forget the Epic of Gilgamesh, which has survived for as long as four millennia.

So am I saying that Firefly is comparable to Shakespeare? Yes! And Iím not the first to make the comparison either.

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